Locomotives used on the Severn Valley Branch in commercial service

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This page gives details and examples of the types of locomotives used on the Severn Valley Branch in commercial service from opening in 1862 until closure. For information on locomotives used since preservation see the rolling stock pages.

The article is intended to cover locomotives used regularly on scheduled passenger and freight services, including non-GWRGreat Western Railway locomotives used by the GWRGreat Western Railway during World War Two for passenger and freight services and ex-LMSLondon Midland & Scottish Railway locomotives used by BRBritish Rail or British Railways. However it does not include the following:

Due to the number involved, external links to Wikipedia pages giving more information on locomotive designers and locomotive classes are included within the article text rather than as a footnote. These may be identified by an external link icon thus: GWR 2201 Class.

Passenger and mixed traffic locomotives

GWRGreat Western Railway 2-4-0 No 180 on Wribbenhall Viaduct circa 1897

The Severn Valley Branch opened in 1862 and was initially operated by the West Midland Railway whose locomotive superintendent was Edward Wilson. The WMR itself had been formed in 1860 by the amalgamation of a number of companies including the Oxford Worcester and Wolverhampton Railway. Locomotives of the WMR and its constituents were therefore the first to be used on the Severn Valley Branch.

Wilson remained in charge until the WMR was absorbed by the GWRGreat Western Railway in 1863. In 1864 Joseph Armstrong succeeded Sir Daniel Gooch as locomotive superintendent of the GWRGreat Western Railway at Swindon, while Joseph's brother George Armstrong ran the GWRGreat Western Railway's other works at Stafford Road, Wolverhampton. For some years thereafter, Swindon remained more involved in broad gauge locomotive design and construction while Wolverhampton was focused on standard gauge activities. Many of the constituent company locomotives were rebuilt there during their working lives, and a variety of 'Wolverhampton types' could be seen on the Severn Valley line until the end of the nineteenth century.[1]

  • West Midland Railway and other locomotives inherited by the GWRGreat Western Railway: 2-4-0 locomotives were commonly used for passenger traffic during the 19th century, some continuing into the years leading up to World War 1. These included the following constituent company locomotives acquired by the GWRGreat Western Railway:
  • Nos 106 and 107: 2-4-0 locomotives built by FairburnCharles Edward Fairburn, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway 1944-1945 in 1845, ex-Birkenhead Railway. Partly rebuilt at Wolverhampton in the 1870s. Withdrawn in 1900 and 1902.[2]
  • No 151: 2-4-0 locomotive used until the 1920s.[3]
  • No 180: 2-4-0 locomotive ex-OWWOxford Worcester and Wolverhampton Railway built by R&W Hawthorn in 1853, withdrawn 1899.[4]
  • No 189: 2-4-0 locomotive ex OWWOxford Worcester and Wolverhampton Railway built by E.B. Wilson in 1855. This locomotive was involved in the derailment at Bridgnorth in 1867. Withdrawn in 1886.[3]
  • Nos 190-193, double-framed 2-4-0s, WMR Nos 93-6 ex Newport, Abergavenny and Hereford Railway, built by E.B. Wilson & Co in 1855-6. Rebuilt twice at Wolverhampton, withdrawn between 1899 and 1903.
  • GWR 439 Class: these inside frame 2-4-0s were some of the first GWRGreat Western Railway-built locomotives on the Branch. Originally designed by Joseph ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877 and built at Swindon in 1868, they were nicknamed 'Bicycles' because of their unusual appearance. Those that served on the Branch were later re-built under George ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877 at Wolverhampton in 1885-6.
  • GWR 455 Class 2-4-0T 'Metro Tank': The 455 Class 'Metro Tank' was another Joseph ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877 design, built at Swindon between 1869 and 1899 with the later examples built under William Dean who succeeded ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877 in 1877. They were an exception to the general use of 2-4-0s on the Branch at the time. The two ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877 brothers were independent characters; while Joseph preferred the 2-4-0T layout over the 0-4-2T, his brother George built no 2-4-0T locomotives at Wolverhampton.
  • GWR 2201 Class: DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902's inside-framed 2-4-0s worked many passenger trains on the branch. They were built at Swindon in 1881-2 and were a domeless-boilered development of Joseph ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877's 806 class. No 2209 was photographed on a Shrewsbury to Kidderminster service on 11 June 1915.[5] All the class had been withdrawn by the end of 1921.
  • Barnums: A number of 'Barnums' were used on the Branch.[2][1] The true 'Barnums' were the GWR 3206 Class, built in 1889 and considered William DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902's most successful 2-4-0 design. They were the last GWRGreat Western Railway locos built with "sandwich" frames. They began life as express mixed traffic locomotives but by the 1920s had been relegated to work on branch lines such as the Severn Valley.[6] Nabarro suggests the term was applied to other earlier classes of 2-4-0 including the Joseph ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877 GWR 717 class single framed 2-4-0, the 439 class (see above), and the Gooch GWR 149 class[1].
  • GWR 3252 'Duke' Class: 'Dukes' were outside framed 4-4-0 locomotives built under DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902 between 1895 and 1899 and originally intended for express passenger train work. However several worked on the Severn Valley Branch as late as World War II, including 3254 Cornubia (shedded at Kidderminster), 3284 Isle of Jersey (shedded at Stourbridge) and 3276 (formerly called 'Dartmoor', shedded at Shrewsbury)[1].
  • GWR 3300 Class: DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902's double-framed inside cylinder 4-4-0 'Bulldogs' (built 1898-1910) also appeared on the Branch during the Second World War.
  • GWR 3200 Class: A number of DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902's 'Bulldogs' were subsequently rebuilt under Charles (C.B.) Collett with 'Duke' boilers in the in the late 1930s to become the 'Earl Class', commonly referred to as 'Dukedogs'. Dukedogs also appeared in occasional use on the Branch in the 1940s and early 50s. One example is preserved, No. 9017 Earl of Berkeley, which visited the SVRSevern Valley Railway for the 2008 Autumn Steam Gala.
  • GWR Steam Railmotor: DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902 was succeeded as Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent by George Jackson Churchward in 1902. ChurchwardGeorge Jackson Churchward, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1902-1922 served as such until 1921 (the role was renamed Chief Mechanical Engineer or "CMEChief Mechanical Engineer" in 1916. ChurchwardGeorge Jackson Churchward, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1902-1922 designed Steam Railmotors were introduced in 1905, mainly working local services at the southern end of the line. Their use continued until the beginning of the 1920s, when they were replaced by auto coaches (also known as auto cars or auto trailers). They were all subsequently converted to unpowered auto coaches although Railmotor 93 has been restored at Didcot.
  • GWR 517 Class: Auto coach workings initially used DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902's 517 Class 0-4-2T. They worked local services at the southern end of the line and occasionally as far as Bridgnorth.
  • GWR 4500 Class: In late 1927 new ChurchwardGeorge Jackson Churchward, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1902-1922 4500 Class small prairies were allocated to Kidderminster Shed from where they entered service on the Branch. Within months one, No. 5508, was involved in an accident when becoming derailed north of Bridgnorth Tunnel after rotten sleepers gave way. Despite this unfortunate beginning these 2-6-2 tanks quickly proved popular with crews and became the main source of motive power until the 1950s for both passenger and freight workings, supplemented by use of pannier tanks. The SVRSevern Valley Railway's 4566 is one of a number of preserved examples. Class members of variant GWR 4575 Class also saw service.
  • GWR 5700 Class: ChurchwardGeorge Jackson Churchward, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1902-1922 was succeeded as CMEChief Mechanical Engineer in 1921 by CollettCharles Benjamin Collett, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1922-1941. He designed the most prolific class of GWRGreat Western Railway locomotive, the 0-6-0PT 'pannier tank' of which more than 860 were built between 1929 and 1950. Although nominally intended for shunting duties (which they carried out at Kidderminster Goods Yard and elsewhere), they were regularly used on local freight and passenger workings in which capacity they served on the Branch until closure. Fittingly, on Sunday 8 September the final 6.58pm Bridgnorth to Birmingham Snow Hill train, normally a diesel railcar service, was hauled by ex-GWRGreat Western Railway pannier tanks 9624 and 4665 carrying a ‘Special Last Train’ headboard. Many examples are preserved including the SVRSevern Valley Railway's 5764 and 7714.
  • GWR 6400 Class: A further CollettCharles Benjamin Collett, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1922-1941 design, for light passenger and push pull workings, and classified by BRBritish Rail or British Railways as 2PThe British Railways system of classifying steam locomotives by power using a number from 0, least powerful, to 9, most powerful, followed by either F for freight, P for Passenger or MT for Mixed Traffic.. Three survived to preservation and 6412, 6430 and 6435 have all visited the SVR for galas.
  • GWR AEC Diesel Railcar: Another of CollettCharles Benjamin Collett, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1922-1941's designs, GWRGreat Western Railway Diesel Railcars were introduced in 1936 on passenger services between Kidderminster, Hartlebury and Stourport, and after World War 2 they were occasionally used on services travelling the whole length of the line. They were generally a successful design although several examples caught fire including No. 10 which was burnt out at Bridgnorth in March 1956. Four examples are preserved including Railcar 22 which was resident on the SVRSevern Valley Railway for some years.
  • GWRGreat Western Railway 5101 Class 'Large PrairieLocomotive with a 2-6-2 wheel configuration: First used during the Second World War. Covered under goods locomotives below, although they also saw regular use on passenger services.
  • BR Standard 3MT 2-6-2T: Following nationalisation in 1947, the line at first continued to use predominantly ex-GWRGreat Western Railway locomotives. However in October 1955 the GWRGreat Western Railway prairies allocated to Shrewsbury were transferred to South Wales and replaced initially by 3 BRBritish Rail or British Railways Standard 3MTThe British Railways system of classifying steam locomotives by power using a number from 0, least powerful, to 9, most powerful, followed by either F for freight, P for Passenger or MT for Mixed Traffic. 2-6-2T's together with various ex-LMSLondon Midland & Scottish Railway tank engines (see below)[7]. 45 BRBritish Rail or British Railways Standard 3MTThe British Railways system of classifying steam locomotives by power using a number from 0, least powerful, to 9, most powerful, followed by either F for freight, P for Passenger or MT for Mixed Traffic. 2-6-2T locomotives were built at BRBritish Rail or British Railways's Swindon works between 1952 and 1955. 13 were allocated at various times to Shrewsbury and two to Kidderminster Shed, with only one locomotive (82030) featuring on both lists.[8] At least eight of the class were photographed in service on the Severn Valley Branch while allocated to Shrewsbury:
Number Loco shed allocation Published photographs
82000 Shrewsbury 1955-1959 Bewdley 1960[9]
82004 Shrewsbury Jun-Sep 1959 Bridgnorth 1959[10], Eardington 1959[11]
82005 Shrewsbury Apr-Jul 1961 Stourport 1961[12]
82007 Shrewsbury Dec 1955-Jun 1958 Bewdley 1956[13]
82009 Shrewsbury Jun-Sep 1959 Coalport 1959[14]
82021 Shrewsbury Jan-Mar 1960 Bewdley 1960[15]
82031 Shrewsbury 1955-1959 Bewdley 1957[16]
82032 Shrewsbury Apr-Aug 1961, Dec 1961-Jul 1964 Kidderminster 1961[17]

A further 18 of the class were to have been built, but the order for these was cancelled as part of BRBritish Rail or British Railways’s Modernisation Plan. The closure of branch lines such as the Severn Valley and the replacement of steam by DMUDiesel Multiple Unit services ultimately led to the withdrawal from service of those already built. None survive, although new build BR 3MT 82045 is under construction at Bridgnorth.

  • BR Standard 4MT 2-6-4T class: The SVRSevern Valley Railway's 80079 is an example of the larger Class 4 tank. Several Class 4 tanks were allocated to Shrewsbury 89A from mid-1962 onwards from where they worked services towards the Cambrian Coast, which included a few displaced from the London, Tilbury and Southend line by electrification.[18]
Locomotive Dates Notes
80078 July 1962 to February 1963 Locomotive preserved
80096 July 1962 to November 1962
80100 July 1962 to July 1965 Locomotive preserved
80101 July 1962 to September 1962
80135 July 1962 to February 1963 Locomotive preserved
80136 July 1962 to February 1963 Locomotive preserved and has visited the SVRSevern Valley Railway in preservation
80098 September 1962 to November 1962 Locomotive preserved and has visited the SVRSevern Valley Railway in preservation
80105 September 1962 to October 1962 Locomotive preserved
80131 September 1962 to February 1963
80070 December 1962 to February 1963
80102 December 1962 to June 1964
80132 December 1962 to February 1963
80070 March 1963 to May 1965

They remained until the end of passenger working, especially north of Bridgnorth.[2][19] It appears they featured much less regularly than the BRBritish Rail or British Railways Standard 3MTThe British Railways system of classifying steam locomotives by power using a number from 0, least powerful, to 9, most powerful, followed by either F for freight, P for Passenger or MT for Mixed Traffic. 82000 tanks and LMR IvattHenry George Ivatt, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway 1946-1948. CME of BR (London Midland Region) 1948-1951 2MTThe British Railways system of classifying steam locomotives by power using a number from 0, least powerful, to 9, most powerful, followed by either F for freight, P for Passenger or MT for Mixed Traffic. 41000 tanks also in use from Shrewsbury at that time.

There is little photographic evidence of their use on the Severn Valley, with the following identified:

  • 80070 on the daily Shrewsbury to Kidderminster pick-up freight at Northwood on 29 May 1963.[20]
  • 80072 was photographed on the line on three occasions during the very cold winter of 1962-63 (whilst allocated to Swansea East Dock, 87D). This locomotive is preserved and has visited the SVRSevern Valley Railway in preservation.
  • 80078 at Bridgnorth in 1963 working from Shrewsbury[21]
  • 80102 on the last day of service in September 1963[19].

Their use on the branch possibly included deputising for failed locomotives as their 'Blue' route availability would theoretically have restricted their speed to 25mph, with the Severn Valley branch classified as ‘dotted blue’ from Bewdley to Buildwas[22].

  • LMS Stanier 3P 2-6-2T: A pre-War design, four members of this class (40086, 40110, 40126 and 40205) were allocated to Shrewsbury and a single example (40085) to Kidderminster, all during periods between February 1960 and November 1962.[23] No. 40110 was photographed at Bridgnorth in 1961.[24] No members of the class survive in preservation.
  • LMS Ivatt Class 2 2-6-2T: Members of this post-War class used on the Branch in 1962-3 included Nos. 41202, 41203, 41207, 41209, 41240 and 41304. 41207 worked the last ever Bridgnorth to Shrewsbury passenger service on 7 September 1963.[2] Four members of the class are preserved, of which two (41241 and 41312) have visited the SVRSevern Valley Railway for Gala events.
  • LMS Fowler 4MT 2-6-4T: 125 of these passenger tanks were built by the LMSLondon Midland & Scottish Railway between 1927 and 1934. Rated as 4PThe British Railways system of classifying steam locomotives by power using a number from 0, least powerful, to 9, most powerful, followed by either F for freight, P for Passenger or MT for Mixed Traffic. by the LMSLondon Midland & Scottish Railway and later as 4MTThe British Railways system of classifying steam locomotives by power using a number from 0, least powerful, to 9, most powerful, followed by either F for freight, P for Passenger or MT for Mixed Traffic. under BRBritish Rail or British Railways, they were the first of the family of LMS/BR Class 4 2-6-4T locomotives which culminated in the BRBritish Rail or British Railways Standard 4MTThe British Railways system of classifying steam locomotives by power using a number from 0, least powerful, to 9, most powerful, followed by either F for freight, P for Passenger or MT for Mixed Traffic. 2-6-4T (see above). Six members of the class (42320/62/72/95/418/20) were allocated to Shrewsbury for a few months in 1959.[25] No members of the class survive in preservation. No 42420 was photographed at Bridgnorth in May 1959.[7]
  • BRBritish Rail or British Railways DMUs: During the last years of the Branch, the GWRGreat Western Railway diesel railcars were replaced by first generation BRBritish Rail or British Railways DMUs. The DMUs used on the line included the Class 116 built by BRBritish Rail or British Railways Derby from 1957 to 1961, an unidentified example being photographed at Arley in 1961 by James S Doubleday. Also used was the Class 122 'Bubble car' built by GCRW in 1958. Class 122 W55018 was photographed at Jackfield in 1963[3].

Goods locomotives

Beyer Goods 344 approaching Bewdley circa 1900
  • "Beyer"_Class GWR 322 Class 'Beyer': The 322 Class 'Beyer', or sometimes 'Beyer Goods', was a Daniel Gooch design 0-6-0 built by Beyer, Peacock & Co. of Manchester between 1864 and 1866, the final 10 ordered by Joseph ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877 being the last 19th-century GWRGreat Western Railway locomotives built for the GWRGreat Western Railway by an outside contractor. No 344 was pictured approaching Bewdley circa 1900 (right), while another Beyer, No 322, was pictured shunting at Bewdley as late as circa 1925.[1]
  • GWR 388 class 'Standard Goods': Joseph ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877's 388 Class 'Standard Goods' was a double-framed 0-6-0 with 5ft driving wheels, built at Swindon between 1866 and 1876. A number worked on the Branch, including one photographed on a northbound freight at Arley circa 1908.[5]
  • GWR 927 class 'Coal Goods': ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877's 'Coal Engine' or 'Coal Goods' was essentially a variant of his Standard Goods with smaller 4ft 6in driving wheels, built at Swindon in 1874. These also worked on the Branch, including No 946 which was photographed on a Kidderminster-Shrewsbury mixed goods on 11 June 1915.[5] No examples of ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877 locomotives have survived into preservation.
  • 2301 class 'Dean Goods': Joseph ArmstrongJoseph Armstrong, Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon Superintendent of the Great Western Railway 1864-1877's successor William DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902 developed the 0-6-0 'DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902 Goods', 260 of which were built at Swindon between 1883 and 1899. 'DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902 Goods' could be seen on the Branch for around sixty years with the last examples of the class not being withdrawn by BRBritish Rail or British Railways until 1957. One example, no. 2516 is preserved as a static exhibit at Swindon's 'Steam' Museum.
  • GWR 2251 Class: CollettCharles Benjamin Collett, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1922-1941's 2251 Class 0-6-0 was introduced in 1930 as a replacement for the 'DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902 Goods'. The 2251 class was intended for medium-powered freight duties with 120 being built by 1948. A number of the class including 3205 were used on the Severn Valley Branch from the mid 1950s onward, mostly operating from Shrewsbury although No. 2207 was housed at Kidderminster Shed. As well as freight duties, they worked occasional summer Sunday passenger trains[2][1]. 3205, the only surviving member of the class, was the first locomotive to arrive on the SVRSevern Valley Railway in preservation, remaining resident for the next 20 years.
  • GWR 2600 'Aberdare' Class: A class of DeanWilliam Dean, Chief Locomotive Engineer of the Great Western Railway 1977-1902 2-6-0 freight locomotives built between 1900 and 1907 and intended for hauling coal trains between Aberdare and Swindon. A number survived into the Second World War and were allocated to various local sheds. 2608, 2620 and 2655 from Stourbridge and 2680 from Hereford regularly worked the wartime 'Tenbury goods'.[26]
  • LNER Class J25: During the Second World War, 40 LNERLondon & North Eastern Railway J25 Class 0-6-0 locomotives (originally WorsdellThomas William Worsdell, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Eastern Railway 1881-1885 and North Eastern Railway 1885-1890 NERNorth Eastern Railway Class P1 and dating from around the turn of the century) were loaned to the GWRGreat Western Railway. Eight of these were allocated to Kidderminster Shed,[27] from where they were used on goods services on the Branch, with one photographed at Arley in 1945.[5][note 1] The last example was withdrawn in 1963 and none survived into preservation.[28]
  • GWR 5101 Class 'Large Prairie': During World War 2 CollettCharles Benjamin Collett, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1922-1941's 51xx large prairies were first introduced on the Branch, after which they saw regular use on colliery and other freight workings as well as passenger services. A number of examples are preserved including the SVRSevern Valley Railway's 5164 and 4150.
  • GWR 4300 Class: Although designated a mixed traffic locomotive, ChurchwardGeorge Jackson Churchward, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1902-1922's GWRGreat Western Railway 4300 class 2-6-0 (built 1911–1932) was commonly seen on freight duties post-World War 2. Examples photographed include Nos 6314,[1] 6382[5], 6393[29], 5333[3] and 5355[30]. They also operated passenger turns such as 6314 operating a Kidderminster to Shrewsbury service on 19 May 1959. The SVRSevern Valley Railway's 7325 is one of the final batch of 20 including design changes by CollettCharles Benjamin Collett, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1922-1941, and one of only two preserved examples of the class.
  • GWR 7800 'Manor' Class: CollettCharles Benjamin Collett, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1922-1941's GWRGreat Western Railway 7800 Manor class 4-6-0s, introduced in 1938, were occasionally seen on troop trains during the Second World War.[33] Although the 4300 Class was the most commonly used tender locomotive for goods working on the Branch post-War, Manors were also used for mixed freight working from time to time.[1] The Manor was designed as a lighter weight mixed traffic locomotive with better route availability (Blue) than the heavier Halls and Granges (Red). As most of the Branch was classified 'dotted blue', 'Red' locomotives were prohibited but 'Blue' locomotives were permitted subject to speed restrictions, making them suitable for slower freight trains. There is photographic evidence of Wyre Forest Line trains via the Severn Valley Branch, such as ex-GWRGreat Western Railway 4 6-0 No. 7810 'Draycott Manor' crossing Dowles Bridge with a goods train in 1955.[34] The SVRSevern Valley Railway is home to three preserved examples, 7802 Bradley Manor, 7812 Erlestoke Manor and 7819 Hinton Manor.
  • GWR 2800 Class: The Post-War 'dotted blue' classification applied to the portion of the Branch between Bewdley and Buildwas, where the Collieries served by the Severn Valley Railway were situated, began "Engines in the "Blue" group (with the exception of the 2-8-0 types)...". ChurchwardGeorge Jackson Churchward, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the Great Western Railway 1902-1922's 2800 Class 2-8-0 freight locomotives, although rated 'blue', were thus too heavy to work over that portion of the Branch. However they were used at the north end of the Branch as far south as Ironbridge power station at Buildwas, as were similarly sized ex-ROD 2-8-0s. The 2800 class is also known to have worked between Hartlebury and Stourport to serve the Stourport Power Station as late as 1965.[2] A number of the 2800 class are preserved including the SVRSevern Valley Railway's 2857.
  • BR Standard Class 9F: In the final years of the Branch, heavy coal trains to the Ironbridge and Stourport power stations were occasional worked by a BRBritish Rail or British Railways Standard 9FThe British Railways system of classifying steam locomotives by power using a number from 0, least powerful, to 9, most powerful, followed by either F for freight, P for Passenger or MT for Mixed Traffic..[1]. Two 9Fs, 92212 and 92214, have spent periods on hire to the SVRSevern Valley Railway in preservation.
  • LMS Standard Class 8F: Ex-LMSLondon Midland & Scottish Railway StanierWilliam Stanier, Chief Mechanical Engineer (CME) of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway 1932-1944 8Fs similar to the SVRSevern Valley Railway's 48773 were also used on occasion in the last years of the Branch. Classmate 48531, then based at Wolverhampton's Oxley MPDMotive Power Depot, was photographed working a southbound coal train at Bewdley on 29 June 1966[35].

Notes

  1. Asleft (1978) refers to use of an LNERLondon & North Eastern Railway J21 (ex NERNorth Eastern Railway C1) on the Branch. This may refer to the J25s.

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 Nabarro (1971), pp 57-63, 'Locomotives on the Line, 1862-1968', plus various photos
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Smith (1968)
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Vanns (1998) pp. 14-21, 'Locomotives'.
  4. Marshall (1989) pp. 135-138, 'Signalling and Operations: Locomotives', plus various photos.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 Geens (1985)
  6. Wikipedia
  7. 7.0 7.1 Webb (2006) p. 36.
  8. BRBritish Rail or British Railways Database
  9. Nabarro (1971) p. 28.
  10. Mitchell & Smith (2007) p. 69.
  11. The 82045 Steam Locomotive Trust, October 2020 news (Retrieved 30 October 2020)
  12. Mitchell & Smith (2007) p. 7.
  13. Webb p. 20.
  14. Peter Shoesmith Collection, see infobox
  15. Smith (1968) p. 18.
  16. SVRSevern Valley Railway News 146 p. 64.
  17. SVRSevern Valley Railway News 52 p. 11.
  18. 80000 page, BRDatabase (Retrieved 23 April 2017)
  19. 19.0 19.1 Magner (1997)
  20. Bewdley Station waiting room
  21. SVRSevern Valley Railway News No. 15
  22. ‘Locomotive Route Availability’, Michael Clemens’ Railways (Retrieved 30 March 2017)
  23. LMS Stanier "3P" Class 2-6-2T page, BR Database (Retrieved 4 November 2020)
  24. Hale (1973) p. 24.
  25. LMS Fowler "4P" Class 2-6-4Tpage on BR database (Retrieved 5 November 2020)
  26. Turley (2005) p. 67.
  27. Turley (2005) p. 15.
  28. LNER Encyclopedia
  29. Vanns (2013)
  30. Mitchell and Smith (2007)
  31. Kidderminster Shed, BR Database(Retrieved 20 November 2020)
  32. Booth, A., 'CEGB, Stourport Power Station', Railways in Worcestershire (Retrieved 20 November 2020)
  33. Smith (1968) p. 24.
  34. Turley, Adrian, in Beddoes & Smith (1995)
  35. Vanns (2017) p. 55.

Links

  • See above