BR Class 09 D4100

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BRBritish Rail or British Railways Class 09 D4100
D4100 20150607.jpg
June 2015, newly re-numbered D4100
Built By BRBritish Rail or British Railways Horwich Works
Configuration 0-6-0
Power type Diesel Electrical
Status Operational
Loco Number D4100
Other Numbers 09012
History
Built 1961
Designed By BRBritish Rail or British Railways
Type Class 09
2013 Arrived on SVRSevern Valley Railway
Technical
Length 29ft 3in
Weight 49t

Diesel Locomotives

D4100 Dick Hardy is a Class 09 0-6-0 350hp diesel electric shunting locomotive. The Class 09 is similar to the Class 08, of which the SVRSevern Valley Railway has a number of examples, but having different gearing giving an increased top speed of 27.5 mph at the expense of a lower tractive effort. D4100 was one of the 26 locomotives originally built as a Class 09; later classified as Class 09/0 to distinguish them from other Class 09s which were rebuilt from Class 08s.

D4100 in main line service

D4100 was built at Horwich Works and entered BRBritish Rail or British Railways service in September 1961 at Ashford (73F), before being allocated to its sub-shed Ashford Chart Leacon in February 1966 and later moving to Feltham in July 1967. The locomotive was fitted with air brakes a year later before another move to Selhurst in July 1970.

In January 1974 D4100 became No 09012 under the TOPSTotal Operations Processing System, an American computer system adopted by BR from the late 1960s to number and manage rolling stock. numbering scheme.[1]

Other depots at which the locomotive served included Old Oak Common and Crewe.[2] 09012 appeared at BRBritish Rail or British Railways Open Days at Stewarts Lane (10 April 1988) and Woking 150 (28-29 May 1988), being named as 'Dick Hardy' at the former.[3][4]

09012 was withdrawn on 31 July 2010.

D4100 in preservation

D4100 arrived on the SVRSevern Valley Railway from Barrow Hill on 22 February 2013, having been purchased from the Harry Needle Railroad Company by SVR(H), supported by the Guarantee Company who contributed half the £40,000 purchase price.[2][5] The locomotive was numbered 09012 and was in departmental grey livery at the time.

Some mechanical work was undertaken, before external restoration. By spring 2014 bodywork repairs and painting were in progress at Kidderminster.[6] It saw use before restoration was complete, however, and an early duty was to help clear the site for building the Diesel Depot in 2014. It had its 'Dick Hardy' nameplates refitted in December 2014[7] and was repainted into BRBritish Rail or British Railways Green livery by early 2015.

On 28 May 2015 Richard 'Dick' Hardy visited the SVRSevern Valley Railway at Kidderminster where he met 09012 and some of the team who restored her The locomotive re-entered service in June 2015 having reverted to the earlier number of D4100, although was failed again shortly afterwards with loose horn guide rivets - a hitherto unknown fault.[8] After repairs were completed, D4100 spent time with Permanent Way and Carriage and Wagon covering for their Ruston shunter. On Sunday 23 October 2016 the Northern Belle carriage set arrived at Kidderminster for cleaning and maintenance, with D4100 completing the shunt into the set's usual location alongside the carriage shed.[9]

The locomotive is normally based at Kidderminster where it regularly carries out shunting duties.

Richard 'Dick' Hardy

Richard 'Dick' Hardy, the railwayman, enthusiast and author after whom the locomotive was named, was born at Leatherhead, Surrey, on October 8, 1923. He signed on as an LNERLondon & North Eastern Railway premium apprentice at Doncaster in 1942 and became acting shedmaster at South Lynn when aged just 22. He ran five other major depots before he was 35, and then oversaw the changeover from steam to modern traction on the busy Stratford district of the Eastern Region. As a Divisional Manager with BRBritish Rail or British Railways he was in control of the East Coast Main Line from London to Grantham as head of the newly created King’s Cross Division, and subsequently head of British Rail’s Liverpool Division.

After retiring in 1982 at the age of 59, he took on a host of advisory and honorary roles in the heritage field including chairmanship of the Steam Locomotive Operators Association. He wrote a number of railway books and articles, including Beeching: Champion of the Railway?, and Bert Hooker: Legendary Railwayman. A book of his photographs, A Life on the Lines: A railwayman's album, was published in 2012. Dick Hardy died on 18 February 2018, aged 94[10][11].

See also

Diesel Locomotives

References

  1. BRDatabase website
  2. 2.02.1 SVRSevern Valley Railway News 181
  3. BR Open Days website (retrieved 6 September 2019)
  4. rail.uk website (retrieved 6 September 2019)
  5. SVRT News 182, Boardroom Notes
  6. SVRSevern Valley Railway News 185
  7. SVR "Meet The Loco" web page
  8. SVRSevern Valley Railway News 192
  9. SVRSevern Valley Railway News 196
  10. The Railway Hub, Obituary
  11. Amazon

Links

BR Class 09 on Wikipedia